Foraging wild food

 

Guest speaker: Diego Bonetto

Building on the knowledge acquired while growing up on a farm in Italy, Diego introduces people to the ever-present food and medicine plants that surround us.

To some plantain, dandelion, chickweed and sow-thistle are a nuisance, to others they are a delicious salad and a seasonal treat. Learn about the most common species growing in your garden, along the green belts and in parks and reserves.

You see weed, Diego sees food.
www.diegobonetto.com

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Permaculture Chat, Nov 2014

I don’t know how many of you went to Woytopia but it was a really worthwhile day. Lots of things were happening, talks, music , stalls and that includes ours which did attract quite a lot of interest and netted us some new members who were very welcome at the last Information Night. The volunteers who were there had a chance to look around because we had enough people to cover for them

The members’ talks were varied: wicking beds, trading without money, how to be a minimalist, wood fuelled ovens, Bhutanese agriculture, Friends of Coastal Open Space System, and Holgate School Garden. So in that lot there must be something of interest to everyone and it was so good to see new members giving talks.

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Wicking Bed workshop

On Sunday 26 October a group that would have been about 15 members and supporters of PCC came together and worked like a well oiled machine for a few hours in the heat to construct 12 large wicking beds at THEDIG (Tuggerah Hall Experimentation , Demonstration and Innovation Garden ) . The wicking beds were planted out with seedling and seed including beans , eggplant , beetroot , lettuce , carrot , mitzuna , cucumber , and various herbs . After discussion about how they work we decided that the wicking beds can be described as large self watering pots . Many of the participants also took home smaller portable wicking beds that only need potted up with soil and their choice of plants .  For those who were unable to make it we are planning to finish off a few more wicking beds before the next Info Night on Tuesday 20 November .

Thanks to all who participated . We now have created a lasting solution to the problem of a garden bed dominated by the weed Pennywort by smothering it with the wicking beds . we can now look forward to increasing yield and sharing surplus with members at Info Nights .

Special thanks to Bob and Helen for providing and delivering the great plastic drums used to make the wicking beds and the tools needed to retrofit them . Also to Robyn for providing seedlings and expertise and Joanne for providing seeds . Also a big thanks to those who continue to bring yummy permaculture food to share at these kind of PCC events .

Remember that growing our own organic is food is the quintessential investment in the health of ourselves and the local environment .

DIG it Cool

Steve

Is your veggie patch self-regulated?

4APPLY SELF-REGULATIONiconThere was another free education activity held by Permaculture Central Coast this weekend and we explored how permaculture principle “apply self-regulation and accept feedback” work in the garden and in our social systems.

With brainstorming, discussions and visits to the garden, we looked at how permies (permaculture gardeners) can set up a self-regulated veggie patch and adopt a non-judgemental feedback-acceptance mechanism in the garden.

This principle is often underestimated as more obvious principles such as “obtain a yield” or “produce no waste” are more readily catching attention. It is however one of the most powerful principles that help sharpen our permaculture design skills and improve our gardening skills.

And as always, there was a plethora of lovely food, delightful company, new friends, and stuff to share (seeds, seedlings, resources).

It was good to see kids too at this event – we’ll be planning activities just for them too in the near future.

These free educational events are hosted by volunteer members and led by trained local permaculture facilitator.  Thanks for your support and stay tuned for upcoming workshops!

 

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Monthly activity “Apply self-regulation and accept feedback”

Permaculture Principles Explained

Put on your hat and sturdy shoes and come explore with us permaculture principle “Apply self-regulation and accept feedback”.

For those who have just joined our group (welcome!), these are new and free events led by a trained facilitator and aimed at exploring the many applications of permaculture principles. More is said on this page:  here is a little blurb about those events

Interested in joining? check out this page!

See you then (and the kids!)!

Alexia Martinez

PCC Activities Coordinator

First wicking bed construction at THEDIG

Steve will start building the very first wicking bed at THEDIG, using the same materials than for the upcoming Wicking Bed Workshop on 26th Oct. All members are welcome to join.

When

Tuesday, 16th Sep, 3pm

Where

Tuggerah Hall, Anzac Road, Tuggerah, directly opposite Hungry Jacks – within easy walking distance of Tuggerah Railway Station.

THEDIG is our community garden behind the Hall. You can access it from the driveway or from the back.

 

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And it was Spring indeed!

Our Spring Gathering last Sunday was as planned! Blue skies, warm sun, a plethora of yummy food, seeds, resources and tips to share, oh and I forgot the most important, a delightful company of like minded permies!

Join us next month for more of that!

Check out the homepage for details and/or come along at our monthly gathering – the third Tuesday of the month (16 September)

Pruning & Striking Workshop

On a cold winter Sunday, a group of motivated permaculturists gathered at Bob & Helen’s place to learn how to prune fruit trees and how to propagate them from cuttings. Steve, who has been trained in horticulture, was our main instructor for the day.

I’ve summarised here what we’ve done. This is by no mean a horticulture treaty, just notes from this workshop.

Bananas

Each tree (grandmother) should have 2 suckers at most:

  • 1 large sucker (daughter) to replace the tree once it has produced a bunch and has been cut.
  • 1 younger sucker (grand-daughter) for the following generation.

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